cafe

  • "The best espresso in downtown!"

    - John Cooper, Gourmet

     
  • "Yummy cupcakes and donuts!"

    - Ann Doe, Teacher

     
  • "Had a real fun there!"

    - Lisa Doe, Lawyer

     
  • "Great atmosphere!"

    - Gordon Doe, Manager

     
  • "Tastes good!"

    - Orman Kent, Architect

     
 
Malshej and Naneghat

Malshej Ghat

Malshej Ghat (माळशेज घाट) is a mountain pass in the Western Ghats range in the Thane district of Maharashtra, India. The site is nestled in the lofty rugged hills of the Western Ghats. It is notorious for landslides during monsoons. The site is home to hundreds of different kinds of flora and fauna especially the avian population such as quails, rails, crakes, flamingos and cuckoos. Malshej ghat is situated in Pune district near the borders of Thane and Ahmednagar districts. It is at a distance of 154 km from south Mumbai towards northeast and 130 km north of Pune. The nearest railhead is Kalyan near Mumbai. To go to Malshej ghat by road from Mumbai, take NH3 to Bhiwandi and turn towards Murbad or take state highway via Kalyan, Murbad, Saralgaon and Vaishakhare. From Pune, take Pune-Nashik highway (NH-50) to Alephata and turn left on Kalyan-Ahmednagar Highway (SH-222) towards Kalyan.


Naneghat

Naneghat (Marathi: नाणेघाट) is a mountain pass in the Western Ghats range near Junnar in Pune district of Maharashtra, India. During the reign of the Satavahana (200 BCE–190 CE), the pass was extensively used as a trade route between Kalyan and Junnar. Literally, the name nane means "coin" and ghat means "pass".The name is given because this path was used as a tollbooth to collect toll from traders crossing the hills. The inscriptions in the caves indicate that they are the work of Satavahana rulers who came into prominence after the fall of the Mauryan empire. It is believed that a powerful woman ruler Naganika, the wife of Satakarni (180–170 BCE) of the Satavahana family commissioned the cave, the statues and the inscriptions. Inscriptions in the cave mention her and her family members. Though the statues adorning the sides of the rectangular cave are now gone, the inscriptions still record some of the achievements of the dynasty. The Naneghat records have proved very important in establishing the history of the region.